Racism

Poverty, Race and America’s Education System, Part 2: Segregated Schools

Schools need support and training to disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline. Image from <a href="http://idreamincolors.org/" target="_blank">idreamincolors.org</a>.
Schools need support and training to disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline. Image from idreamincolors.org.
In the first part of her "Separate and Unequal" blog series, Perry Firth examined some troubling outcomes of the re-segregation of our nation’s schools, including the disproportionality of discipline that results in suspensions, expulsions and dropping out. These contribute to the systemic problem known as the “school-to-prison pipeline” and lack of success for many students of color. In Part Two, she writes about the impact of all this and what we can do about it.

Poverty, Race and America’s Education System, Part 1: School Discipline and Students of Color

Schools are more segregated by race than many people are aware of. Image from <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2014/05/15/school-segregation-civil-rights-project/9115823/" target="_blank">usatoday.com</a>
Schools are more segregated by race than many people are aware of. Image from usatoday.com
Children across the state have said goodbye to summer and headed back to school. Research shows that some of these students, through no fault of their own, will receive unequal treatment in the classroom. School psychology grad student Perry Firth explains what that unequal treatment looks like and why it happens in this first part of her two-part series, "Separate and Unequal: Poverty, Race and America’s Education System."

“I’ve Dealt With a Lot of Stereotypes”: Danielle’s Long Journey Home

Danielle D'Haiti (left) recorded a StoryCorps conversation with her friend TaTeasha Davis Brown. Image credit: StoryCorps.
Danielle D'Haiti (left) recorded a StoryCorps conversation with her friend TaTeasha Davis Brown. Image credit: StoryCorps.
In a new StoryCorps conversation, Danielle relays a grocery store customer's snide comment to her white adoptive mother. It was just one of many times she has been disparaged for being a black woman. And racism in our community face goes far beyond unkind remarks.
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