Racism

Stand Against Racism: Stereotypes Put Domestic Violence Survivors in Danger

Doris O'Neal manages the domestic violence program at the YWCA of Seattle | King | Snohomish. Her team offered a powerful presentation about the intersection of racism and domestic violence as part of the YWCA Stand Against Racism.
Doris O'Neal manages the domestic violence program at the YWCA of Seattle | King | Snohomish. Her team offered a powerful presentation about the intersection of racism and domestic violence as part of the YWCA Stand Against Racism.
At a weekly support group for African-American survivors of domestic violence, the facilitator once asked the women why they were reluctant to report domestic violence to police. Among the many reasons was that the women feared being blamed for the domestic violence situation. As the case of Marissa Alexander shows, they have good reason to be afraid.

Violence Against Women: So Common, It’s Cultural

Violence against women is more ubiquitous than many of us would like to think. Under-reported and rarely prosecuted, this type of violence says as much about its perpetrators as it does about our culture’s continued ambivalence about the value of women. Image from <a href="http://pixabay.com/en/woman-face-contour-burnout-blank-73403/" target="_blank">pixabay.com</a>.
Violence against women is more ubiquitous than many of us would like to think. Under-reported and rarely prosecuted, this type of violence says as much about its perpetrators as it does about our culture’s continued ambivalence about the value of women. Image from pixabay.com.
Today’s American women have more opportunity, empowerment and success than ever. Yet violence is a persistent problem. Especially when it occurs in the intersection of race, power, poverty and history, large segments of the female population are left without support or justice from our legal system. Perry Firth from the Seattle University Project on Family Homelessness shares disturbing statistics, and takes a close look at the cultural forces that cause and sustain violence against women in this thought-provoking post.

A Web of Risk: Homelessness and the Special Education Category “Emotional Disturbance”

Children placed in the special education category Emotional Disturbance can struggle with everything from depression and anxiety disorders to disruptive, oppositional and argumentative behavior. Image from istockphoto.com
Children placed in the special education category Emotional Disturbance can struggle with everything from depression and anxiety disorders to disruptive, oppositional and argumentative behavior. Image from istockphoto.com
Students who receive services under the special education category Emotional Disturbance have particularly poor outcomes, both in educational attainment and other indicators of life success. The children who have been diagnosed under this category provide an example of how poverty, other demographic variables, and educational practices all interact to influence not only school success, but special education placement.

“Very Often, LGBT Teens Have No Concept that Their Life Can Be Good”

LGBTQ youth experiencing homelessness raise awareness about their struggles. Image from Instinct Magazine.
LGBTQ youth experiencing homelessness raise awareness about their struggles. Image from Instinct Magazine.
As many as 40 percent of homeless youth identify as LGBTQ, and oftentimes they end up trapped in a cycle of abuse, poverty, and street life that lasts well into adulthood. Guest blogger Sarah Bartlett illuminates some of the struggles with poverty and homelessness that many members of the LGBTQ community experience.

Domestic Violence: Applying the Lens of Race Thoughtfully

We're in the middle of the Week Without Violence, an initiative created by YWCA USA nearly 20 years ago to mobilize people in communities across the United States to take action against all forms of violence, wherever it occurs. In recognition of this initiative, as well as Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Firesteel is exploring the connections between domestic abuse and family homelessness. In line with the YWCA's commitment to social justice and ending racism, we are also interested in looking at domestic violence through the lens of race. We invited Mike Wong and Patricia Hayden from YWCA Seattle | King | Snohomish's Social Justice Accountability Team to contribute today's guest post.

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