Affordable Housing

Housing Discrimination Leaves People Out in the Cold

Kitsap County resident Carissa Daniels advocates for a proposed state law that would make it illegal for landlords to discriminate against tenants based on the source of their income. Photo courtesy Carissa Daniels.
Kitsap County resident Carissa Daniels advocates for a proposed state law that would make it illegal for landlords to discriminate against tenants based on the source of their income. Photo courtesy Carissa Daniels.
A domestic violence survivor who lives with a disability, Carissa Daniels uses a housing choice (aka Section 8) voucher to help pay the rent. She writes that when she and her daughter look for housing, they run into landlords who refuse to accept her voucher. Advocates are working to outlaw this kind of discrimination; find out how you can help!

“I Feel Like Seattle May Be Kicking Me Out”

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Law student Josh loves Seattle, but rising rent prices make him doubt whether he'll be able to continue living in the city. The lack of affordable housing is a crisis not only in Seattle, but also in many communities across the state. Do you want to live in a community where everybody has the opportunity to live in a safe, healthy, affordable home? Then prepare to take action as we head into the state legislative session, which begins on Jan. 11. We share how.

Two Worlds Collide: Inequality in America

A “Sleep Out” in Washington, D.C.’s Freedom Plaza during Hunger & Homelessness Awareness Week in mid-November. Photo Credit: Laura Tarnosky, <a href="http://streetsense.org/article/covenant-house-advocates-freedom-plaza-sleep-out-previews-vigil/#.VlzIkmSrRz9" target="_blank"><span class="s1">Street Sense.</span></a>
A “Sleep Out” in Washington, D.C.’s Freedom Plaza during Hunger & Homelessness Awareness Week in mid-November. Photo Credit: Laura Tarnosky, Street Sense.
Seattle University student Lindsey Habenicht recently interned as a reporter with the Street Sense street newspaper in Washington, D.C. Because the internship was unpaid and housing costs were outrageously high (even for a shared bedroom), Lindsey also worked at Nordstrom in an affluent part of Virginia. She found it "eye-opening, jarring, and heart-wrenching" to go back and forth between settings of poverty and abundance, and also to watch her department store co-workers display a lack of empathy for a woman who was experiencing homelessness and spent time in the store. Lindsey reflects on her experience, takes a look at the national War on Poverty, and shares how we can all take action to address an economy that is out of balance.
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