Domestic Violence: Social Isolation and Homelessness

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and we're exploring the connections between domestic violence and family homelessness. In this video, Norene Roberts, program manager at a domestic violence shelter, explains how abusers isolate their victims from their friends and family -- and how this isolation can contribute to homelessness. She also gives advice for helping a loved one who is experiencing domestic violence.

Domestic Violence Awareness: Join the YWCA Week Without Violence

Today marks the beginning of the Week Without Violence, an initiative created by YWCA USA nearly 20 years ago to mobilize people in communities across the United States to take action against all forms of violence, wherever it occurs. Washington state Sen. Steve Hobbs has done important work to remove barriers to housing for survivors of domestic violence.  In this video, Sen. Hobbs talks about the importance of the Fair Tenant Screening Act. He also invites you to join the Week Without Violence -- we hope you will!

Domestic Violence: Naomi’s Story

Domestic violence isn't just physical abuse -- it can also be emotional and economic abuse. In Naomi's case, her former partner manipulated her finances and stole money from her. He isolated her from her friends and family and threatened to kill her. Though Naomi wanted to leave him, she feared retaliation. She also needed him around to help pay the bills.

When Naomi did break away from her abuser, she couldn't afford rent. She and her two children spent a year and a half sleeping in shelters and on friends' and family members' floors and couches. Sadly, Naomi's story is all too common; domestic violence is one of the leading causes of family homelessness.

Domestic Violence: Inocente’s Story

In the Academy Award-winning documentary "Inocente," the featured artist talks about growing up with a physically abusive father. What many people don't know is that Inocente Izucar has also experienced domestic violence at the hands of a boyfriend. In this video, Inocente shares how she got past that relationship, and encourages others to break the silence about domestic violence.

Domestic Violence: What Is Economic Abuse?

Seventy-four percent of domestic violence survivors stayed with a partner longer than they wanted to because of financial concerns. If a survivor doesn’t have money for a rental deposit, a hotel room or even a bus ride, she is going to have a hard time leaving her abuser. Many perpetrators of domestic violence -- particularly males -- limit their victims’ access to financial resources in order to trap them.

In this video, Jennifer Quiróz, Economic Resilience Program Manager at the YWCA Seattle | King | Snohomish, explains how economic abuse can look in different relationships. She also shares why economic abuse is such an effective tool for trapping women in violent situations.

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